7 Tips on Preventing Identity Theft

In the course of the day, you do many activities that put your personal information at risk – from writing a check at the store to charging merchandise in person or over the phone. You may not think twice about these transactions, but others might.

Identity theft – when a perpetrator assumes someone’s identity for personal or financial gain, like stealing a credit card to make financial transactions in the victim’s name – is the fastest-growing crime in America.

According to Javelin’s 2018 Identity Fraud Report, in 2017, there were 16.7 million victims of identity fraud, a record high that followed a previous record the year before. The amount stolen hit $16.8 billion last year as 30 percent of U.S. consumers were notified of a data breach, an increase of 12 percent from 2016. For the first time, more Social Security numbers were exposed than credit card numbers. According to the Javelin study, account takeovers tripled in 2017 from 2016, and losses totaled $5.1 billion.

The National Citizens’ Crime Prevention Campaign, sponsored by the National Crime Prevention Council, aims to educate consumers about what they can do to prevent identity theft. The council offers the following tips.

  • Do not give out your personal information unless you initiate the contact or know the person or company with whom you are dealing. Also, never disclose personal information, such as a Social Security number or bank account number, in response to an email. Legitimate businesses will not ask you to do this.
  • Do not disclose your credit card number to an online vendor unless it is encrypted and the site is secure. Look at the first part of the Web address on your browser. It should read “https://.”
  • Do not write your Social Security number or telephone number on checks or credit card receipts.
  • Remove all documents with personal information from your hard drive before discarding your computer or sending it in for repair.
  • Shred discarded documents, including pre-approved credit card applications, bank statements, store receipts and utility bills. “Dumpster divers” can gain access to your personal information if such items are thrown in the trash.
  • Cancel all credit cards that have not been used in the last six months. Open credit is a prime target for thieves.
  • Order your credit report at least twice a year and report any mistakes to the credit reporting agency in writing.

If you are a victim of identity theft, contact your local police department as soon as possible. If your identity was stolen in one jurisdiction but used in another, you may have to report the crime in both jurisdictions.

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Tania N. Johnson
Email: tanianjohnson@credit4success.com
Facebook – Facebook.com/credit4success

“Helping consumers take back their power through credit restoration to build generational wealth and protect their families.”

PS: There are 10 Credit Myths the Credit Agencies don’t want you to know so you can protect your assets. To get your copy of this free report click here.

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